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Water Resources

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General water information

• Population: 100,119
• Water connections: 34,907
• Water demand by customer category: 
    Residential - 70% 
    Commercial - 15% 
    Industrial - 5% 
    Institutional - 10%

Water demand

Annual daily average: 12 million gallons
Summer peak: 22 million gallons per day
Winter daily average: 10 million gallons per day
Average annual usage: 13,441 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 

Water supplies 

Current water supplies are surface water (reservoirs and lakes) and the required minimum daily groundwater production from the Hickory Aquifer (approximately 1.5 million gallons per day). As of August 1, San Angelo had 73 months of water supply. That is a worst-case scenario that assumes no rainfall and no runoff into reservoirs over that span.

Primary sources

O.H. Ivie Reservoir 
• Owned and operated by the Colorado River Municipal Water District
• Purpose: Water supply
• Supplies: Odessa, Big Spring, Snyder, Midland, Abilene, San Angelo, Ballinger and Millersview-Doole 
• Storage capacity: 554,339 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 
• Capacity filled: 71.4% Sept. 25, 2019 
 
Twin Buttes Reservoir

• Owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Managed under contract by the City of San Angelo.     
• Purpose: Water supply, irrigation and flood control
• Supplies: City of San Angelo, Tom Green County and Water Control Improvement District No. 1
• Storage capacity: 186,244 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 
• Capacity filled: 64.5% as of Sept. 25, 2019
 
Lake Nasworthy 
• Owned and operated by the City of San Angelo
• Purpose: Water supply
• Supplies: City of San Angelo
• Storage capacity: 12,500 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 
• Capacity filled: 87.8% as of Sept. 25, 2019

O.C. Fisher Reservoir
• Owned and operated by the Upper Colorado River Authority
• Purpose: Water supply and flood control
• Supplies: City of San Angelo and UCRA
• Storage capacity: 119,000 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 
• Capacity filled: 11.7% as of Sept. 25, 2019
 
Lake Spence  
• Owned and operated by the Colorado River Municipal Water District
• Purpose: Water supply
• Supplies: Odessa, Big Spring, Snyder, Midland and San Angelo
• Storage Capacity: 488,000 acre-feet. An acre-foot equals 325,851 gallons. 
• Capacity filled: 28.7% as of Sept. 25, 2019

Newer water supplies 

Hickory Aquifer: 35,000 acres of groundwater rights acquired in 1971 and 1972. 62 miles southeast of San Angelo in McCullough County near Brady. The Hickory Aquifer project currently has the ability to pump and treat a total of 8 million gallons per day. The City is exploring full development of the Hickory to produce up to 12 million gallons per day.

The City of San Angelo is also engaged in the West Texas Water Partnership, a collaborative effort with the cities of Abilene and Midland to jointly find and develop water sources that could serve all three communities and the rest of the region.

Drought levels

Stages are based on available supply from all surface water sources:
• Standard conservation: more than 2 years supply 
• Drought Level 1: less than 2 years supply 
• Drought Level 2: 18 months or less 
• Drought Level 3: 12 months or less

With approximately 73 months of supply as of August 1, the City is in standard conservation, which restricts out side watering to twice every seven days at no more than 1 inch per week and not between the hours of noon to 6:00pm. Runoff of more than 150 feet down any street, gutter, alley or ditch is also prohibited.

Report watering violations by clicking on this link or calling 325-657-4409. For more information, go to cosatx.us/water. Do your part; be water smart! 

City IDs, pursues next water supply



The City of San Angelo has identified the leading option for its next water supply and taken the first step toward its development.

The Concho River Water Project is a move to extend San Angelo’s sources beyond its lakes and the Hickory Aquifer. It will do so by adding a reliable and sustainable source that will help meet water needs for decades to come.

The project involves releasing highly treated water from the City’s wastewater treatment plant into the Concho River. After it has flowed down that “natural pipeline,” the water will be recouped farther downstream. From there, it will be piped to the water treatment plant, where it will be treated to drinking standards.

“This is water San Angelo already has,” said attorney Jason Hill, the City’s special counsel for water. “We’re just able to make better use of it. It’s a win-win for the community.”

On Sept. 18, the City Council unanimously agreed to pursue state permits that will ensure the water is treated to adequately high standards before its release into the river.

Prior to recommending the Concho River project, engineers and City staff studied 24 possible water supplies. Those included surface water, groundwater and direct reuse. The experts and City officials concluded the Concho River Water Project is a reliable and cost-effective source, will produce water with an improved taste, can be developed relatively quickly, and utilizes proven science. Cities have long released their treated wastewater downstream into streams, rivers and lakes. Treated wastewater from Ballinger, Robert Lee and Winters, for instance, flows into San Angelo’s primary water source, Ivie Reservoir.

“We are releasing it into the Concho so we have what we call an environmental buffer,” said Scott Hibbs, principal water resource engineer with eHT, an Abilene engineering firm. “So we’re letting Mother Nature take care of some of the treatment aspects.”

Securing state permits could take as little as two to three years. Completing the entire project could take about five years and will cost about $120 million dollars. That includes upgrades to the water and wastewater treatment plants. Those improvements would be needed regardless of which new water source was chosen.

When completed, the Concho River Water Project will produce about 7.5 million gallons per day. By comparison, the Hickory Aquifer is currently capable of producing 8 million gallons per day, although that is being expanded to 12 million gallons. San Angelo averages about 12 million gallons of daily usage.

Work continues by the West Texas Water Partnership to develop a long-term source that can serve San Angelo, Abilene and Midland. The Concho River Water Project will help meet local water demands for about the next 50 years.

 “This takes San Angelo a long ways down the road of water security,” Hill said. “And when I say a long ways, I’m talking generationally … 2060, 2070.”

The project will also diversify San Angelo’s portfolio of water sources. Because the City will not be dependent upon any one source of water, San Angelo will be better able to weather times of drought.