Stormwater runoff is generated when precipitation from rain and snow flows over land or impervious surfaces and does not percolate into the ground. As the runoff flows over the land or impervious surfaces (paved streets, parking lots, concrete and rooftops), it accumulates debris, chemicals, sediment and other pollutants that adversely affect water quality.
Impervious surfaces do not allow the absorption of rainwater, and include driveways, sidewalks and rooftops. Impervious materials include asphalt, cement, brick and stone.
 

Stormwater fee rates

This document contains basic information about the stormwater fee, its purpose and how it is spent. The rates are as follows:

Residences (based on square footage of homes and accessory buildings on each lot)

Tier 1 - $3 per month
• 0-1,000 square feet
• 2,992 properties
• 9.72 percent of all residential properties

Tier 2 - $3 per month
• 1,001-2,000 square feet
• 14,436 properties
• 46.91 percent of all residential properties

Tier 3 - $4 per month
• 2,001 square feet-3,000 square feet
• 9,524 properties
• 30.95 percent of all residential properties

Tier 4 - $5 per month
• 3,001 square feet and up
• 3,820 properties
• 12.41 percent of all residential properties

Non-residential (based on square footage of all impervious surfaces* on each lot)
This category includes nonprofit organizations, apartment complexes and commercial property that do not fall into a traditional residential designation.

Tier 1 - $7.50 per month
• 0-5,000 square feet
• 1,069 properties
• 28.43 percent of all nonresidential properties
• Independent American Energy Co. (1404 S. Oakes St.) is an example that falls into this category.

Tier 2 - $15 per month
• 5,001-15,000 square feet
• 1,273 properties
• 33.86 percent of all nonresidential properties
• Tony’s Garage is an example that falls into this category.

Tier 3 - $30 per month
• 15,001-50,000 square feet
• 945 properties
• 25.13 percent of all nonresidential properties
• Dairy Queen (5225 Sherwood Way) is an example that falls into this category.

Tier 4 - $100 per month
• 50,001-150,000 square feet
• 331 properties
• 8.80 percent of all nonresidential properties
• River Crest Hospital (1636 Hunters Glen Road) is an example that falls into this category.

Tier 5 - $300 per month
• 150,001-500,000 square feet
• 120 properties
• 3.19 percent of all nonresidential properties
• Graham Central Station (2545 Southwest Blvd.) is an example that falls into this category.

Tier 6 - $500 per month
• 500,001 square feet and up
• 22 properties
• 0.59 percent of all nonresidential properties
• Wal-Mart Supercenter (5501 Sherwood Way) is an example that falls into this category.

What you can do

FAQs

What requirements does the City of San Angelo have for the design of stormwater conveyance systems?

The City of San Angelo adopted Article 12.400 of the Code of Ordinances (Stormwater Ordinance) and accompanying Stormwater Design Manual to guide development in the design and construction of stormwater facilities. The ordinance and manual help to ensure that new development or redevelopment accounts for the protection and welfare of the general public in regard to stormwater runoff during the preliminary or design phase of the development.

What construction sites require stormwater permits or controls?

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) requires that any construction project that disturbs one acre of land or more develop a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). Projects that disturb five acres of land or more must submit a notice of intent to discharge construction site stormwater runoff, notify the local MS4 operator, and post construction site notice at the project location in addition to the SWPPP. All construction site projects that disturb any land (even less than one acre) are required to construct erosion control measures to mitigate stormwater pollution from the site.

What is a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)?

An SWPPP is a document that details best management practices (BMPs) for a construction site. It documents the activities and timelines of construction of the project that may have an impact on stormwater runoff quality. A SWPPP also describes and locates physical stormwater controls, such as filter fabric fences, inlet protection, erosion control logs, rock berms, etc., that are to be constructed on or near the site to protect stormwater quality. BMPs noted in the SWPPP must be installed before land is disturbed and maintained throughout the project. Help to develop a SWPPP can be found here.

What is an MS4, and who is the operator?

MS4 stands for Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System. MS4s are stormwater systems that are governed and maintained by public or private entities. The City of San Angelo has an MS4 and the operator is the Stormwater Program Manager. One of the requirements of the permit is for the city to develop a Stormwater Management Plan to manage stormwater and set goals for water quality.  When notices of intent are required by a construction project, the operator of the MS4 into which construction site runoff flows shall be notified. Other MS4s in the San Angelo area include Tom Green County, Goodfellow Air Force Base and Angelo State University. MS4s are regulated by and must be permitted through the TCEQ to discharge stormwater runoff.

 

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